Individual Differences in Emotion Regulation Abilities: Action Orientation’s Impact on Intuition, Negativity Bias in Depression, and Self-Infiltration

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Title: Individual Differences in Emotion Regulation Abilities: Action Orientation’s Impact on Intuition, Negativity Bias in Depression, and Self-Infiltration
Authors: Radtke, Elise L.
Thesis advisor: Prof. Dr. Julius Kuhl
Thesis referee: Prof. Dr. Roman Osinsky
Abstract: Using action orientation after failure as a measure of individual differences in emotion regulation abilities (ERA), this thesis’ studies investigated the impact of ERA on cognition, behavior, and own versus imposed goals differentiation. The first study used cortisol as a physiological stress marker to replicate the link between ERA and the ability to make intuitive judgments under stress. High ERA were associated with increased performance in an intuition task under stress. In contrast, when feeling no stress, low ERA were associated with increased performance in an intuition task. The second study showed that ERA can compensate for depression-associated biased processing of negative stimuli. This effect was present even at mild to moderate depression levels. Replicating earlier findings, the third study showed that ERA are associated with an increased ability to distinguish self-chosen from imposed goals. Most importantly, the study identified activation in the right medial prefrontal cortex as a neural correlate of identifying self-chosen goals, and activation in the anterior cingulate cortex, as a correlate of falsely identifying imposed goals as self-chosen ones. Altogether, these studies show the necessity to consider individual differences in ERA in stress, clinical, and motivational research. The findings are discussed with respect to three theories that relate to motivation and personality from behavioral and neurobiological perspectives, namely, Personality Systems Interaction Theory, Predictive and Reactive Control Systems Theory, and Self-Determination Theory.
URL: https://repositorium.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/urn:nbn:de:gbv:700-202001212531
Subject Keywords: emotion regulation; personality; action orientation; rumination; cortisol; depression; Stroop; self-infiltration
Issue Date: 21-Jan-2020
Type of publication: Dissertation oder Habilitation [doctoralThesis]
Appears in Collections:FB08 - E-Dissertationen

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