Ravens parallel great apes in physical and social cognitive skills

Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item:
https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:gbv:700-202106074943
Open Access logo originally created by the Public Library of Science (PLoS)
Title: Ravens parallel great apes in physical and social cognitive skills
Authors: Pika, Simone
Sima, Miriam Jennifer
Blum, Christian R.
Herrmann, Esther
Mundry, Roger
ORCID of the author: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-4398-2337
https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8544-8303
https://orcid.org/0000-0002-1736-3559
Abstract: Human children show unique cognitive skills for dealing with the social world but their cognitive performance is paralleled by great apes in many tasks dealing with the physical world. Recent studies suggested that members of a songbird family—corvids—also evolved complex cognitive skills but a detailed understanding of the full scope of their cognition was, until now, not existent. Furthermore, relatively little is known about their cognitive development. Here, we conducted the first systematic, quantitative large-scale assessment of physical and social cognitive performance of common ravens with a special focus on development. To do so, we fine-tuned one of the most comprehensive experimental test-batteries, the Primate Cognition Test Battery (PCTB), to raven features enabling also a direct, quantitative comparison with the cognitive performance of two great ape species. Full-blown cognitive skills were already present at the age of four months with subadult ravens’ cognitive performance appearing very similar to that of adult apes in tasks of physical (quantities, and causality) and social cognition (social learning, communication, and theory of mind). These unprecedented findings strengthen recent assessments of ravens’ general intelligence, and aid to the growing evidence that the lack of a specific cortical architecture does not hinder advanced cognitive skills. Difficulties in certain cognitive scales further emphasize the quest to develop comparative test batteries that tap into true species rather than human specific cognitive skills, and suggest that socialization of test individuals may play a crucial role. We conclude to pay more attention to the impact of personality on cognitive output, and a currently neglected topic in Animal Cognition—the linkage between ontogeny and cognitive performance.
Citations: Pika, S., Sima, M.J., Blum, C.R. et al. Ravens parallel great apes in physical and social cognitive skills. Sci Rep 10, 20617
URL: https://repositorium.ub.uni-osnabrueck.de/handle/urn:nbn:de:gbv:700-202106074943
Subject Keywords: Evolutionary developmental biology; Human behaviour; Social evolution
Issue Date: 10-Dec-2020
License name: Attribution 4.0 International
License url: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Type of publication: Einzelbeitrag in einer wissenschaftlichen Zeitschrift [article]
Appears in Collections:FB08 - Hochschulschriften
Open-Access-Publikationsfonds

Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormat 
scientificreports_Pika_etal_2020.pdf1,37 MBAdobe PDF
scientificreports_Pika_etal_2020.pdf
Thumbnail
View/Open


This item is licensed under a Creative Commons License Creative Commons